Netflix’s Tribes of Europa has apocalyptic promise out of all the brand new TV

Monday mornings for the Polygon employees are all the time thrilling, due in no small half to us having the prospect to excitedly gab and share about all of the cool stuff we watched over the weekend— whether or not it’s the newest sci-fi collection on Netflix, a newly launched Korean motion flick, or chipping away at our private anime watchlist.

And as ordinary, the solutions vary extensively, as some folks take a look at what’s new and widespread on streaming companies, and a few return to previous favorites. Listed below are a number of of the exhibits and flicks we’re having fun with watching proper now, and what you may take pleasure in watching as properly.


Tribes of Europa

A man covered in black body paint stands in a circular arena in Netflix’s Tribes of Europa

Photograph: Gordon Timpen

I’m a sucker for the post-apocalypse, so seeing a brand new collection pop up within the Netflix high 10 listing meant that I needed to give Tribes of Europa a attempt.

The German-language program takes place within the 2070s and pits a number of factions in opposition to one another in a vaguely feudal confrontation. The Origines dwell within the woods, eking out a residing near nature. The Crows are fairly cartoonishly violent, all wearing black and huffing stimulants as they gun down anybody of their path. In between are the Atlantians, a high-tech faction whose sole consultant is a wounded pilot on a secret mission to ship a bizarre glowing dice someplace.

The standout actor for me is Henriette Confurious, who performs the stalwart Liv. I’m just one episode in and issues are already a bit bloody and violent for my liking. We’ll see if issues veer extra towards Starvation Video games or probably the most disturbing elements of Recreation of Thrones over the following few episodes. —Charlie Corridor

Tribes of Europa is streaming on Netflix.

And the whole lot else we’re watching…


Agent Carter

Agent Carter

Picture: ABC

Final weekend, in a haze of starvation for our subsequent WandaVision repair, my husband and I made a decision that watching one other MCU present was the methadone we wanted. So we lastly began watching Agent Carter, the much-beloved two-season collection that follows Captain America’s lady-love Peggy as she continues to work as a authorities agent within the interval after he crash-lands within the Arctic and disappears. This present was surprisingly arduous to search out for some time — IIRC, Amazon had an unique license sooner or later, and it was solely obtainable by them and on bodily media — however the introduction of Disney Plus lastly introduced it to streaming, and we’re watching a number of episodes now each week as we come down from our WandaVision haze.

As adventure-drama Agent Carter is fairly normal: Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) is working down some thieves who broke right into a secret vault of harmful innovations created by Howard Stark (Dominic Cooper), who’s been branded as a traitor to America and is now on the lam. His butler Jarvis (James D’Arcy) has been tasked with serving to her out. The crime-and-terrorism enterprise is normal procedural stuff, besides … Jarvis could be very fortunately married and Peggy’s nonetheless mourning Cap, so there’s no tedious will-they-won’t-they pressure. And the post-WWII period, males are returning to work and ladies are being pushed out of jobs, so Peggy’s coping with loads of gross performative sexism at work, and having to be a super-agent by night time whereas enduring “Deal with my submitting for me, doll” gibes by day.

That dynamic, her grief over Cap and reluctance to share it with others, and her guilt over a pal who dies as collateral injury to her work early on all mix to make her reluctant to belief or get near anybody. I’m actually having fun with the complexity of her character work and the way unlikeable her disappointment and prickliness make her, particularly as counterpoint to WandaVision’s issues in bringing throughout grief. Oh, and never by the way, this present is trendy as heck, and price watching only for the costumes, units, hairstyles, and cinematography alone. It’s a extremely handsome program, doll. —Tasha Robinson

Agent Carter is streaming on Disney Plus.

Hunter x Hunter

ensemble collage of Gon, Killua, Hisoka, and more from Hunter x Hunter

Photograph: Viz Media

That is actually all I’ve been excited about for the previous month and a half or so. My journey into anime began off slowly, however at this level I’m at full throttle and gained’t be trying again any time quickly. Hunter x Hunter might be probably the most stereotypical shōnen anime I’ve watched to this point. As somebody who prefers slice-of-life, romance, and comedy, I wasn’t certain how I’d fare with one thing so action-heavy. However for lack of a greater description … it’s simply cool. I like the characters, however I additionally love this wild, wacky world the place folks have bizarre, particular talents like conjuring up an infinite vacuum cleaner and writing haikus that change objects round them. I like that the airships have little faces on them, that everybody on this world is so extremely desensitized to violence however for probably the most half they’re all fairly first rate folks, that there’s a complete online game that may solely be performed by folks with tremendous duper particular powers. As for the characters, I’ve already written about how Kurapika and Leorio have my total coronary heart, however the episodes I’m watching now focus extra on Gon and Killua’s particular bond and man, if it ain’t endearing.

Lastly, simply bear in mind one factor: Bungee gum has the properties of each rubber and gum. —Petrana Radulovic

Hunter x Hunter is streaming on Netflix and Crunchyroll.


Justified Season 2

Timothy Olyphant as Deputy Raylan Givens in Justified

Photograph: Prashant Gupta/FX/Copyright FX Networks 2011

I’ve spent the final couple weeks catching up with Justified, a present I’ve all the time preferred however by no means dedicated to seeing by. How foolish I used to be. Season 2 of Justified, which I completed tearing by this weekend, is the place the present leaps from uncommonly good cop present to Kentucky Shakespeare, a shocking rumination on generational cycles of violence and exploitation. It’s obtained all of the intrigue of an excellent crime story, however with the added nasty, venomous chew of all of it unfolding in a city the place everybody is aware of your title, and your daddy’s too. —Joshua Rivera

Justified is streaming on Hulu.


Some Like It Scorching

Marilyn Monroe in Some Like It Hot

Photograph: Criterion Assortment

Final week (or possibly it was the week earlier than — time is meltier than ever) a New York Occasions reporter turned the primary character of Twitter for declaring that they broke their private rule to by no means watch black-and-white films as a result of I assume black-and-white films had been rough-around-the-edges and out-of-step with the modern conception of drama and, properly, that simply wasn’t their jam. Everybody’s entitled to their opinion, after all, however after catching Billy Wilder’s 1959 comedy Some Like It Scorching this weekend, all I might suppose is “c’mon!”

A sort of proto-Sister Act, Some Like It Scorching finds two jazz musicians (performed by legends Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon) on the run after witnessing a mafia hit job throughout a speakeasy raid. To avert the gangsters, the pair disguise themselves in clothes and be part of an all-female band. Each befriend and swoon over the group’s ukulele participant Sugar Kane (Marilyn Monroe). Musical numbers and loads of hijinks ensue. Pushing the buttons of censorship on the time — even the concept of cross-dressing was seen with a raised eyebrow within the 1950s — the film crackles with Wilder’s patented dialogue, whereas Curtis and Lemon have a discipline day determining methods to “play” girls. The madcap vitality is true up there with Bridesmaids or 30 Rock, and it’s a disgrace to think about that it’s black-and-white veneer would hold folks away. —Matt Patches

Some Like It Scorching is streaming on Tubi and Pluto TV.


Stationery Sunday

Over the previous few weeks, I and others have come to know Sundays as Stationery Sundays, due to a string of stationery and journaling-themed Twitch streams broadcast all through the day. This weekend was no totally different. By the point Sunday morning hit, I had gathered all my stationery and letter writing provides, able to arrange store alongside a gaggle of others — some broadcasting dwell on Twitch, others journaling alongside quietly within the chat. First, I tuned into April Wu of The Stationery Cafe podcast, then Miranda Sanchez from IGN, each unboxing an excellent quantity of recent stationery goodies. Afterwards, I watched Lillian Arrigoni work on a bullet journal.

It’s been so good to observe, journal, and draw alongside others with the identical passion as me. It’s a extremely soothing method to spend a Sunday. —Nicole Carpenter

You, too, can take pleasure in Stationery Sundays every week on Twitch.


The Swordsman

Jang Hyuk and Joe Talsim face off in Choi Jaehoon’s The Swordsman

Photograph: Properly Go USA Leisure

This weekend I sat down to observe Choi Jaehoon’s The Swordsman (which simply launched on VOD this weekend) and was completely entertained. Jang-Hyuk’s efficiency because the blind former royal bodyguard-turned-vengeful swordsman Tae-yul was as charming as Gained-ho Son’s deft cinematography, and Joe Taslim of The Raid and The Evening Comes For Us fame’s flip because the devious antagonist Lord Gurutai is one other terrific efficiency within the actor’s exemplar profession. The motion is quick and frenzied, however don’t are available anticipating Wuxia balletics or extreme gore. Should you’re searching for period-piece martial arts drama with engrossing performances and pulse-pounding swordplay, it’s undoubtedly value a watch. —Toussaint Egan

The Swordsman is accessible to lease on digital, $4.99 Amazon on Apple; $3.99 on Vudu.


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